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Android Applications Development

Android Applications Development

Android software development is the process by which new applications are created for the Android operating system. Applications are usually developed in the Java programming language using the Android Software Development Kit, but other development tools are available.
As of July 2013, more than 1 million applications have been developed for Android with over 25 billion downloads. A June 2011 research indicated that over 67% of mobile developers used the platform, at the time of publication. Around 105 million units of Android smart phones were shipped which acquires a total share of 68% in overall smart phones sale.

Processing

The Processing environment, which also uses the Java language, has supported an Android mode since version 1.5; integration with device camera and sensors is possible using the Ketai library
The goal of Simple is to bring an easy-to-learn-and-use language to the Android platform. Simple is a BASIC dialect for developing Android applications. It targets professional and non-professional programmers alike in that it allows programmers to quickly write Android applications that use the Android runtime components. When considering how to build iOS and Android applications, many people think that the indigenous languages, Objective-C and Java, respectively, are the only choice. However, over the past few years, an entire new ecosystem of platforms for building mobile applications has emerged.

Basic4android

Basic4android is a commercial product similar to Simple. It is inspired by Microsoft Visual Basic 6 and Microsoft Visual Studio. It makes android programming much simpler for regular Visual Basic programmers who find coding in Java difficult. Basic4android is very active, and there is a strong online community of Basic4android developers.

Community-based firmware

There is a community of open-source enthusiasts that build and share Android-based firmware with a number of customizations and additional features, such as FLAC lossless audio support and the ability to store downloaded applications. This usually involves rooting the device. Rooting allows users root access to the operating system, enabling full control of the phone. In order to use custom firmwares the device's boot loader must be unlocked. Rooting alone does not allow the flashing of custom firmware. Modified firmwares allow users of older phones to use applications available only on newer releases.
Those firmware packages are updated frequently, incorporate elements of Android functionality that haven't yet been officially released within a carrier-sanctioned firmware, and tend to have fewer limitations. CyanogenMod and OMFGB are examples of such firmware.